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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)
for border security. i mean, there are citizens in my state who do not live in a secure environment. we live in a pretty secure environment here, certainly in the senate, we've got guards and there's people every night in the part -- the southern part of my state that have drug traffickers and people going across, the guns. >> so how do you convince republicans about the path to citizenship? >> well, look, i'll give you a little straight talk. look at the last election. look at the last election. we are losing dramatically the hispanic vote, which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons, and we've got to understand that. second of all, this -- we can't go on forever with 11 million people living in this country in the shadows in an illegal status. we cannot forever have children who were born here -- who were brought here by their parents when they were small children to live in the shadows, as well. so i think the time is right. by the way, we just acted to avert a nuclear option in the senate. believe it or not, i see some glimmer of bipartisanship out there. >> how about we've go
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> with temperatures in washington hovering in the 20s, what may be the last surviving housefly of the winter season was hovering in the white house today, and had an encounter with the president during a press event. >> that's why today i am nominating mary jo white to lead the security and exchange commission, and richard cordray to continue leading the consumer financial protection bureau. this guy is bothering me here. >> the incident left us with this unfortunate still photo of the president. and while we presume secret service wrestled the offender to the ground, the president has a history with flies, famously dispatching one during an interview with our own john harwood. >>> the roar that could be heard for miles today around huntsville, alabama was the test-firing of a vintage rocket
changed. and our competitors are vying to provide more supportive environments for innovators, inventions, and started countries. there has been a seachange in the field of opportunity back home for those foreign nationals who in increasing members are educated in the united states and who we've been forced to return to the nation of origin. so even though many of the most talented young people from around the globe still pour into the united states to obtain their masters or doctoral degrees in the s.t.e.m., now more than ever, they are not just tempted to take their education home with them and start businesses elsewhere, they are attracted by their own country and forced to our outdated immigration system. what an unwise way to compete in the global economy. our outdated immigration system hasn't adapted for the modern world. half of all masters and doctoral degrees in s.t.e.m. fields at american universities are today earned by foreign-born students who then face an uncertain expensive than unwieldy path to pursuing their dreams in the united states. our country is hemorrhaging innova
be a better candidate for them in this environment that they expect to be running in in 2014. you don't want to be an incumbent. you don't want to be entrenched washington. you want to have a little more leeway to run against washington. >> coming out from the outside it actually provides what you're saying. it gives them that balance. i think what the biggest problem right now in washington is that you have all these senators, these lions that basically remember how washington used to work. nonpartisan -- in a bipartisanship manner. they're getting tired. what message does that say for the next generation of leadership? >> perry, it's interesting. they're free votes now. tom harkin running for re-election, where would he have been on guns? saxby chambliss, where's he going to be? >> he might be someone who plays a big role in somebody who compromises on the debt, deficit. that's what he wants to do anyway. he can now behave as he wants to behave. >> how important, pete, is it that these guys announce early these decisions? >> it's huge. especially for primaries to try and hopefully clear th
school environment, moving forward we want to continue to dramatically improve existing schools and give parents the opportunity to choose legitimate alternatives to failing schools. [applause] in addition to transforming education, we must continue to reform government. take a waste, fraud and abuse commission, for example. so far they've identified nearly $456 million worth of savings. [applause] our reforms allow state government to focus on efficiency so taxpayers get great service without needless spending and waste. our reforms also give schools and local governments flexibility to make management choices to improve their communities while saving money. for example be, our technical schools are saving millions of dollars by making simple, common sense changes to instructor schedules and overtime policies. and they're saving money with a program that allows nonviolent jail inmates to do maintenance work like mowing grass and shoveling snow. and much of the work being done is about finding creative solutions to problems faced by the state. several years ago the previous governor clos
, and if they cannot any to be civilly committed input into protected environments, and the other thing we need to deal with this crime. we can talk about background checks, systems, and all these other things, but criminals enough up the background check systems. they need to get to the prison system, and the need to stay there, but that is going to require political backbone, and the determination to prosecute criminals and sadly, this a ministration it is just not happening. lori: i have to tell you, and our short conversation hearing your for ticket safety and mental health, it sounds like the nra is sort of changing the way it approaches the subject. >> not at all. italy's been abuzz safe and responsible gun ownership. we would 25 million kids through in a legal children's safety program and have the lowest firearm accident rate in 100 years. we have tens of thousands of certified instructors he. ♪ responsibility. everything we do is about safe and responsible gun ownership. we are just about serious solutions to the underlying problem and not papering over with feel-good legislation that will k
and our universities for the blind that we need here in america. not only the environment in which they can come here and study, but say here if they are needed. connell: making sure that it is not included in this deal, whatever that turns out to be? >> amnesty. there has to be a pathway to citizenship. people who follow the law should not be burdened by those that do not. connell: defined what that means . >> the 11 login or so have to be encouraged to come out of the shadows and join those already in line. there has to be an incentive for them to do that. it has to be negotiated. that is what we are afraid of. we do not believe that 11 million should be granted citizenship to prevent those that have followed the rules from the pathway to citizenship that they followed. connell: last thing on the prediction of the politics on this before we let you go. you think this will be a hard-fought, year-long battle or do you think we will get something done really quick? >> it depends on whether or not they want to treat this like obamacare. no transparency. i think it will be very hard t
open the environment is a good thing? >> you will think this is shameless sucking up, but the best blog out there is national review online. [applause] i look at it every day. the other one i recommend to you is mickey kaus. he writes a blog that is in the daily collar and he is a brilliant new liberal. he ran against boxer in a primary. he had a budget of about $600. he ran for the senate. but he is an interesting writer. he is a liberal who is extremely open and able to see through arguments in a way that is rare. so if you're going to read a little, you should read him. yes, i think the openness is very good. it is that we basically have democratized the political discourse. the problem is that it will kill the mainstream -- the traditional way of doing business in media. i am not talking about liberal or conservative. there is nobody that has been able to come up with a business model that will preserve the newspapers in the long run. so i'm not sure where leads. but right now, ladies leading to replace where would we have known for 100 years, whether leading newspapers, magazines,
the external environment has changed that the degree of danger is different now those effects may become dominant. and so yes, i can see a down side for doing thing that you believe are effective, legal and appropriate. if it denies you the cooperation of others who see it in a different way. and i think we're all aware of that. we knew that. hence in 2006, we huddled up. what's appropriate going forward with no judgment whatsoever on what went on before? different circumstances. different people. >> not having read the c.i. report, i would say that before it's released, it needs to be fixed. if, in fact, it concludes that the enhanced interrogation program had no value, they need to take a second look and maybe even spend more time and talk to those of us who that were involved in the program way back when. i spent a lot of time talking to people who work with me. so my deputies were very senior analysts, very logical and these are folks that will analyze even aspect of things. and he gave me a 15-republican explanation as to why he thought it was ethical and why he agreed to participat
? in 1992, you had the riots in los angeles. you could find yourself in a lawless environment in this country. the story was about a place called koreatown. there are marauding gangs going through the area burning stores, looting and robbing. the vice-president said in response to me, he said, no, you would be better off with a 12 gauge shotgun. that is his opinion, and i respect it. i have an ar-15 at home and i have not hurt anybody and i do not intend to, but i would be better off protecting my family if there was law-and-order breakdown in my neighborhood. i do not think that makes me an unreasonable person. mr. trotter when you say you speak on behalf of millions of women out there who believe an ar-15 makes them safer, there were a lot of giggles in the room, and that explains the dilemma. the people who were giggling were saying to you, that is crazy. nobody i know thinks that way. which reminds me of the harvard professor who said i cannot believe mcgovern lost. everyone i knew voted for him. i bet there are people on our side that cannot believe obama won because ever
who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice question for you. is he a fool, or a villain? [laughter] >> i think he learned a lesson or two with
and regulations with very little impact on the global climate. in this tight budget environment with so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing. i don't know if you have specific thoughts. >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts on it more than we have time now. and i'm not going to abuse that privilege. but i will say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. you want to do business and do it well in america, we got to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you, massachusetts, fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they're growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. t
environment, with some any competing priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought into limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy, not help us as a country, and not help a schoolboy -- not help us globally. >> i have a lot of specific thoughts on it. the solution to climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the down sides that you are expressing concern about. and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues of this. if you want to do business and do it well in america, you have to get into the energy race. other countries are in it. in massachusetts, the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy efficiency companies. and they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i cannot emphasize that strongly enough. the market that made america rich -- richer -- we have always been reached -- but the market them it is richer in the 1990's was the technology market. it was a $1 trillion market with 1 billion us
environment in eastern libya and in benghazi and in a direct threat on our compound. we have work to do inside of the department and with our partners and of the dod and the intelligence community to constantly be taking that information and make sure it does get to the right people and it isn't somehow stovepipe or stalled but that it does rise to decision makers and i am committed to improving every way that i can with the arb told us to do on assessing our intelligence and i think it's fair to say, congressman, that we have to do this now because i predict that we are going to be as we saw in algeria seeing all kinds of asymmetric threats not just to the government is devotees that private sector facilities in to nisha although we protected our embassy and our school was badly damaged so we have to take a broad view and i think it is a start but it's not the whole story. >> mr. grayson from florida. 63 mr. chairman and secretary clinton for your contributions to securing america's place in the world for the past four years and for your contributions towards world peace. the first question i
wages or in a way that could get a better working environment, then it's okay. if you're not, saying your bored is going to cause some problems. >> especially if you're bored being on twitter and facebook. it depends on the category. the board upheld the filing of a reporter for the arizona daily star who was bored and posted online saying what? no overnight homicide? you're slacking, tucson. well, that was considered not acceptable for his employer at the newspaper. >> bad taste might be a problem. but what about how are companies handling this? are they being forced to expand their policies? i mean how broad does it need to be? >> the n.l.r.b. is actually urging or pushing companies to rewrite their policies so that they're in line with their new series of recommendations. so they're trying to get the cost-cos of the world and other large companies... >> target and general motors among those. >> ... to do it. wal-mart gets an a-plus because wal-mart already rewrote its policies to be more in line with what the n.l.r.b. is say joog what the chairman of the n.l.r.b. is saying is that
, to that helps to set the environment, i think, but there's still a lot of work to do. the president admits that as we get closer to a resolution or an actual law, that it's going to be tougher. there will be a lot of sack feeses made there. we still need the public to be engaged, and that's why he went out directly to las vegas where the support was overwhelming for him, for many progressives who were thinking about immigration reform, and i think it was a good way of telling the latino community and all the other immigrant groups that right now are faced with problems and immigration because it's a broken system, that, hey, we're going to get this done. we're going to get it done if n a timely fashion. >> we see marco rubio joining these senators, but others have -- ted cruz, rush limbaugh and others have taken strong positions against the proposals. how long is the president going to give the senate and the house to try to work this out before he will come forth with his own proposals? sfwli think he said he is looking anywhere from maybe four to five months and he has to work its way th
of this little country of israel to exist in such a hostile environment. as well as all of the problems that senator hagel has with regard, really, to the global leadership of the united states. i think it's -- he could not have picked a more troublesome, out of the mainstream nominee and i'm not alone. "the washington post" in an editorial early this year begged the president not to choose senator hagel as being totally out of the mainstream. >> senator wicker, thank you for your time. i greatly appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> let's bring in nia-malika henderson, jim rootenberg and jack jacobs. jim, i would like to start off with you. you were on yesterday and discussing an article you'd written discussing who's behind the television ads and radio ads who have gone after chuck hagel on israel, on his comments that were seen as anti-gay. the list goes on and on here but we know it's coming from secret donors. this factor in to the questions that we heard today from the senators? >> i don't -- you know, i have to say to me this is the real stuff and these are obviously lawmakers putting
says the murder of a dozen children changed the political environment. >> sandy hook, i think, really destroys all of the kind of tales that the nra is trying to weave about young people and guns. guns are positive things in the climate of america. >> reporter: feinstein of course was the author of the 199 assault weapons ban which was not renewed after it expired 10 years later, jamie. jamie: the one we've been hearing most about is the vice president who has been leading the administration's push for these new gun laws. what is he up to? >> reporter: biden is a former prosecutor. he is the author of violence against women act. he held a couple events last week including google plus hankout and roundtable at virginia commonwealth university. his criticism of assault weapons that they put police at disadvantage. cops find themselves outgunned. new york city police commissioner ray kelley said he would like an assault weapons ban but he said handguns is the big problem. >> we don't want them on the streets, make no mistake about it. but the problem is the handgun. 60% of the murders in
with republicans about spending cuts, um, in a very bad environment with consumer demand going downward. that is not an environment for him to score wins with. jon: and 7.8% unemployment and his jobs council is going away, but the president has four more years. we'll continue to watch it. a.b. stoddard from "the hill," thank you. >> thank you. jenna: well, a frightening standoff right now in alabama where a 5-year-old boy is being held hostage in a bizarre underground bunker by a suspected killer. former nypd hostage negotiator on the delicate task that is really facing police right now. what do you do in this situation? we'll talk about it with an expert coming up. plus, seeing is believing, where a massive twister tore through a town smashing homes and killing at least one perp. rick reichmuth on where this violent storm is moving now. >> get over here. ♪ you know my heart burns for you... ♪ i'm up next, but now i'm sging the heartburn blues. hold on, prilosec isn't for fast relief. cue up alka-seltzer. it stops heartburn fast. ♪ oh what a relief it is! cue up alka-seltzer. it s
't confirm that they did it. there's a new environment in that region. before i let you go, north korea is threatening another underground nuclear test. how credible is this threat? >> it's very credible. we have seen in the past that they have used this to their political advantage. the chinese have put pressure on them at their u.s. request. that's a good thing. >> to not do it? >> to not do it. however, they are pushing the envelope and i believe that this is this new, young leader who's decided that he needs to show that he's in charge, gain the credibility from the military and if that means further isolation through a nuclear test, i think he'll do it. >> kim jong-un. the next day he's launching a missile or threatening a nuclear test underground. i don't know which direction he's moving. >> i think he believes that he needs to get the supporter to prove that he's a hard liner and a leader and will continue -- the only way to do well in that country is being part of the military infrastructure and so he needs to keep that loyal if he's going to stay in charge. i think what you're
economist say would be the policy that would make a fundamental change in the market and in the environment. essentially it puts a price on carbon pollution. carbon pollution is the main source -- carbon pollution or green house gases are the main cause of global warming. right now the emitters of carbon pollution, that's coal fired power plants, oil refineries are allowed to emit this carbon pollution and they don't pay anything for it. the idea is if carbon polluters were to have to started paying, if there were a price on this carbon pollution, it races the price of fossil fuels, it race it is price of energy and that will fund innocently drive the market toward low polluting sources of energy. that is the number one way that you could really make a difference in this area. it's also politically incredibly controversial. that means raising the price of electricity, of gasoline, of all the fundamental ways in which we drive our economy. it's very controversial. it would be very difficult. it's a third rail, an idea that is great and admired in theory but politically impossible. host: what
environment the united states is facing? what we have better discussions during these debates that centered more on the economy? >> i think in the end, this one did come down to the economy. the president may be basing his second term on social issues. if you take his inauguration speech as a guidepost to where he wants to go from here. but i did not hear him to talk a lot about the campaign -- during the campaign. the economy began to get better. i did not see him spending a lot of time talking about gay rights during the election. i did not hear him talk very much about gun control. i think it was mentioned once in one of the debates. i think they thought they had to get -- what they concentrated on, in some ways, this was not so much an election about issues as it was about identifying their voters and getting their voters to the polls and recognizing the demographics in this country were changing dramatically. they figured that out and how to get people to the polls and republicans did not do as well. i think the core of the president's message was the economy. >> the last question beca
on the threat environment that the united states is in. for most of history we don't talk about this very much. we have maintained a strong military, not so that we can buy, so that we can not fight. it is a point i think that tom made which is important, it is i want to segue to fred, is to understand what it is that is involved in a military operation. fred has just finished a very important piece of work, i should a shorter longer, an interactive piece on the web that i know we be happy to share with folks that explains just what it is that we can do with particular numbers of troops we have as the president makes critical decisions about afghanistan but it's not just about warfighters and bureaucrats in d.c. fighting a war is a big logistical exercise. fred, do want to talk about that and some of those ceramic decisions? >> sure. if we become very accustomed to throwing numbers of troops around and people of gotten way too comfortable with pulling numbers out of the air and discussing them as though they were serious, and the effect of that is that very few americans i think actually under
the audience that everything is fine, the global environment is not threatened. the critics jumped here is the guy who just sold current tv to al-jazeera getting undetermined amount of funding from the country of qatar that gets money from oil reserves. >> isn't there a contradiction in that. >> i understand the criticism. i disagree with that. al-jazeera has long since established itself as a really distinguished and effective news gathering organization. >> but funding from a company that bases its wealth on fossil fuels and fossil fuels are the enemy you target in climate change. isn't there a bit of hypocrisy in that. >> i get the criticism. i just disagree with it because this network has established itself. it is objective. it's in countries around the world. the climate coverage has been outstanding and expensive. >>> he was a congressional investigator and has been a political activist for over a decade now. wow. he gets the criticism. he just disagrees with it because al-jazeera is such a distinguished effective nuss gathering information whose climate coverage he likes. is tha
. there should never, ever be a question about health and the safety and the environment that we put our men and women and their families in when we ask them to make sacrifices to serve this country, and i am committed to do that, and we will have further conversations. >> i know you have answered a number of questions about israel already today, but i do have one i want to ask you also. there is a special and historic bond between the u.s. and israel. and i am personally committed to israel's security and identity as a jewish state. when we met earlier i was pleased to hear you agree and also support a two-state solution and oppose any unilateral declaration of a palestinian state. we also discussed the need for a strong military and intelligence engagement between the u.s. and israel. >> just last fall i was in israel and i have spoken with senior military officials from both countries and i have continually heard the ties between our military and our intelligence organization has never been stronger. if confirmed, do you intend to maintain this close relationship and do you have any idea
that let you do what you do and, live in this environment. bill: there he is. speaking like an american, huh? like that. mickelson's net worth is $180 million. the guy ain't hurting but tiger woods says mickelson was right about taxes especially in california and says high taxes was why woods moved out of the california and moved to florida with no state income tax in the first place. both of these guys are from california. mickelson made his hometown there for, he was born and raised in san diego. for him to leave the state is a big, big deal. if you're taking home 37 cents on the dollar, 47 cents on the dollar, i think it is okay to speak up. martha: it is something for all americans to give some thought to. bill: why did he apologize? martha: i don't know why he apologized, the backlash against it, saying is it right for any american to spend 63 cents of their dollar, of every dollar they make and hand it over to the government? bill: state, county, federal. martha: so much discussion about fair share and people, people obviously, some people are outraged. he can afford it. that is n
create a new environment here in the senate where we will let the minority have their amendments but also the minority party will also let the process move forward. and i think that's the tradeoff that was the fundamental aspect of the negotiations that we continued in the senator from michigan's office for many, many days and many hours. if someone wants to block -- i think the senator from michigan and the senator from maryland would agree. if someone wants to block the senator from moving forward, they can at least do it for some period of time. and what's happened here, look back 10, 15 years ago, the tree wasn't filled up. but at the same time, on the other side, amendments were wa t produced by the hundreds. there was -- there's got to b be -- i believe that the object and i believe the outcome of this hard-earned compromise will be that there will be a greater degree of comity in the senate which would allow us to achieve the legislative goals that all of us seek. mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that -- that the senator from michigan join the senator from maryland and me in
with little impact on the global climate. in the tight budget environment with the so many competing american priorities, i would ask you to give considerable thought in to limiting significantly resources that would not help us as an economy or country, and not help us globally in perhaps the efforts you might be pursuing there. i dmont if you have specific thoughts? >> i do. i have a lot of specific thoughts. more than we have time for now. i'm not going abuse the privilege. ly say this to you, the solution to climate change is energy policy, and the opportunity of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you're expressing concern about, and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues in this. you want to do business and do it well in america? we've got get to the energy race. other countries are in it. i can tell you massachusetts that the fastest growing sector of our economy is clean energy and energy e fresh sei in -- efficiency in companies. they are growing faster than any other sector. the same is true in california. this is a job creator. i can'
part of my state are still not living in a security environment. we owe them that. at the same time, i think more and more americans are agreeing these 11 million people need to come out of the shadows and we need to give them a path to citizenship but not favoritism. >> senator mccain, you're exactly right. the polls are showing the majority of americans do support the type of proposal you and chuck schumer are putting forward. what would you say to conservative house republicans that will call anything you try to pat in t-- pass in the senat amnesty. >> i think we will and already are reaching across to our friendson the otherside talking and i think they realize the realities of the 21st century and there will be some difficulties and it's long hard path. i'm confident we will succeed. >> senator shuman, willie geist in new york, good to see you this morning. there's a piece in the "new york times" where a reporter goes to a diner in south carolina. the concern down there is people are being rewarded for illegal behavior, a, and b, being given priority over workers in america who ca
, just real quickly. the environment has changed since 2007. that is why we are guardedly optimistic. there are a whole bunch of minds out there that we have to avoid or defuse but i'm confident and cautiously optimistic we can get this done. if we don't think i think it's going to have from of haitians not just for republicans but for the entire country. do have a nation with 11 million people living in the shadows is not a country we like to teach our country about. spoony something that you shared that you both came from from the house. what is the path in getting to the house? passing a measure? >> i think probably one of the scenarios is a majority of the democrats in the house and a significant and maybe a majority of the republicans in the house. i would not anticipate a unanimous republican support but i think there can be significant republican support. >> the point it would make a larger number of republicans begin the senate the more like in my judgment as we will pass it in the house and second going through the committee and allowing amendments and goings to the floor an
? it is a fantastic place to be. i'm at the intersection of public policy and advanced technology for environment and safety. if it is a fantastic deal to be in now. it is the wave of the future. advanced vehicles, and advanced technologies. we work with the government on regulatory issues, collect a lot of information on the future of energy, where it's headed in the u.s. and globally. and we tried to use the information to help steer toyota's advanced development. guest: one of the high points is greenhouse gases and fuel economy for our vehicles. the auto industry has signed up for some fairly aggressive standards that will take us to the 2025 model year. they are aggressive standards. consumers will have to embrace the technologies we're trying to get out there. host: what does that really mean? guest: the target is 54 miles per hour by 2025. we have a lot of work to do. our strategy is are hybrid strategy. toyota had 16% of our new vehicle fleet were hybrid vehicles. the industry itself is that 3%. we intend to maintain that leadership. host: that means you have to do with the future of what
that come with it. in this current economic environment, the last thing that we should be doing is making it more difficult for businesses to expand and hire more people. but because of the president's health care law, that is exactly what's happening. "the wall street journal" ran a piece about a small business owner called carl shanstra, who owns a parts assembly phak trier near chicago, illinois. it is called automation systems, lar l.c. sales have been growing, the business is going well, but he has a problem because he already employs close to 50 peevment well that meanses a getting dangerously close to the law's dangerous threshold and the new health care burdens that it would place on him, including all the expenses. as i puts it, "i'll be hammered for having more people at work. the cost of imroig providing insurance would be enormous much the cost of paying the ttach pen in the for national offering insurance would also be enormous. now, that's not a good option for a small business like automation systems, a small business that has an opportunity to expand and hire more people."
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)